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What are the differences between Julbo’s Sunglass Lenses?

January 17, 2017

What are the differences between Julbo’s Sunglass Lenses?

Julbo has been producing high-performance sunglasses & goggles for the outdoors since their founding in 1888 in the French Alps. With 6 technical lenses specially designed for different activities you’re sure to find perfect UV protection regardless of your outdoor pursuit. Photochromic, photochromic with polarisation, super-strong NXT construction, and anti-fog are just some of the technologies available on Julbo’s high performance lenses.

A key feature of Julbo lenses is the NXT technology. Originally developed for military helicopter windscreens, this NXT technology has been adopted by Julbo to create near unbreakable lenses. Tested to meet the impact requirements defined by the ANSI Z87.1 standard for industrial application, a standard thickness Julbo NXT lens will survive intact an impact of a 6mm steel ball traveling at 160km/hour!

Specifically, Julbo NXT lenses are in compliance with these paragraphs:

7.4.2.1.1 High Mass Impact
High impact spectacles shall be capable of resisting an impact from a pointed projectile weighing 500g (17.6oz) dropped from a height of 127cm (50.0in). The spectacles shall be tested in accordance with section 14.1. No piece shall be detached from the inner surface of any spectacle component and the lens shall be retained in the frame. In addition, the lens shall not fracture.

7.4.2.1.2 High Velocity Impact
High impact spectacles shall be capable of resisting impact from a 6.35mm (0.25in) diameter steel ball traveling at a velocity of 45.7m/s (150ft/s). The spectacles shall be tested in accordance with section 14.2. No contact with the eye of the headform is permitted as a result of impact. No piece shall be detached from the inner surface of any spectacle component and the lens shall be retained in the frame. In addition, the lens shall not fracture.

Cameleon Lens and the differences from other Julbo sunglass lenses

Cameleon Lens, predominantly designed for alpine, high altitude & mountaineering use. The Cameleon Lens provides high protection in extreme UV situations and is designed to provide excellent clarity of vision in snow and alpine terrain.

  • Category 2 to 4 photochromic.
  • Polarised (80%).
  • Non-Temperature-Sensitive Photochromic Activation: lens gets darker and lighter regardless of the temperature, even in extreme cold.
  • Anti fog coating.
  • Brown tint to accentuate relief, helpful in snow.
  • Predominately designed for alpine and high altitude use; mountaineering etc.
  • Visible light transmission rate: 5-20%

Zebra Lens and the differences from other Julbo sunglass lenses

Zebra Lens, the most all-round Lens in the range, perfect for running, riding, and alpine use. With up to category 4 protection level the Zebra is appropriate for extreme UV conditions such as high-altitude and alpine use. The Zebra Lens is excellent for resort skiing and snowboarding. It is also great in situations when you’re moving from light to shade because of the extremely fast transition between category 2 and category 4.

  • Category 2 to 4 photochromic.
  • Extremely fast transition, about 22 seconds from category 2 to 4.
  • Anti fog coating.
  • Anti oil coating to reduce finger marks.
  • Brown tint to accentuate relief, helpful in snow.
  • Visible light transmission rate: 7-35%

Zebra Light Lens and the differences from other Julbo sunglass lenses

Zebra Light Lens, perfect for running, mountain biking, cycling and other activities when your moving from bright sun to deep shade and back again.

  • Category 1 to 3 photochromic.
  • Non-Temperature-Sensitive Photochromic Activation: lens gets darker and lighter regardless of the temperature.
  • Anti fog coating.
  • Anti oil coating to reduce finger marks.
  • Brown tint to accentuate relief (this lens is not dark enough for sunny snow conditions, only extremely overcast snow conditions).
  • Zebra light is also available with Red Flash Finish which accentuates contrast.
  • Visible light transmission rate: 17-75%

Octopus Lens and the differences from other Julbo sunglass lenses

Octopus Lens, predominantly designed for sailing, paddling, and other water sports and activities. Polarisation provides for excellent clarity of vision in bright, reflecting-light conditions, and with a hydrophilic coating on the outside the Octopus Lens sheds water quickly and efficiently for a clear view.

  • Category 2 to 4 photochromic.
  • Non-Temperature-Sensitive Photochromic Activation: lens gets darker and lighter regardless of the temperature.
  • Polarised.
  • External water/oil repellent coating.
  • Grey tint for faithful colour reproduction.
  • Visible light transmission rate: 6-27%

SnowTiger Lens and the differences from other Julbo sunglass lenses

SnowTiger Lens, designed specifically for alpine use in the resort and backcountry. The SnowTiger Lens is a goggle specific lens.

  • Category 2 to 3 photochromic
  • Anti fog coating
  • Polarised (57%)
    Glare control filter to increase readability in terrain
  • Orange tint increases contrast in terrain
  • Visible light transmission rate: 14-34%

Falcon Lens and the differences from other Julbo sunglass lenses

Falcon Lens, designed for travel and day to day use.

  • Category 2 to 3 photochromic.
  • Polarised.
  • Anti reflective coating.
  • Oil repellent coating to reduce finger marks.
  • Appropriate for driving as the photochromic activation is not inhibited by windscreen cutting UV light.

NXT Technology Impact Properties
All of Julbo’s photochromic lenses detailed above are made using Julbo’s NXT Technology. NXT Technology Lenses in standard thickness meet the impact requirement defined by the ANSI Z87.1 standard for industrial application.

Specifically, they are in compliance with these paragraphs:

7.4.2.1.1 High Mass Impact
High impact spectacles shall be capable of resisting an impact from a pointed projectile weighing 500g (17.6oz) dropped from a height of 127cm (50.0in). The spectacles shall be tested in accordance with section 14.1. No piece shall be detached from the inner surface of any spectacle component and the lens shall be retained in the frame. In addition, the lens shall not fracture.

7.4.2.1.2 High Velocity Impact
High impact spectacles shall be capable of resisting impact from a 6.35mm (0.25in) diameter steel ball traveling at a velocity of 45.7m/s (150ft/s). The spectacles shall be tested in accordance with section 14.2. No contact with the eye of the headform is permitted as a result of impact. No piece shall be detached from the inner surface of any spectacle component and the lens shall be retained in the frame. In addition, the lens shall not fracture.


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