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Why Merino is not a good baselayer for adventure

June 13, 2019

Why Merino is not a good baselayer for adventure

With the explosion of merino being used as a base layer for adventure activities, we have seen a parallel explosion of complaints about leaking or non-breathable rainwear. Rather than the rainwear not keeping out and removing moisture like it should, users discomfort has been found to be, almost uniformly, caused by slow drying merino fabric sitting next to skin.

Merino absorbs up to 30% of its weight in water, compared to a technical synthetic fabric like Polartec Power Dry that absorbs only 1% of its weight in water.

Merino is often touted as being warm when wet. Even if this is true, you are guaranteed to be warmer if your next to skin fabric is not wet in the first place.

In almost all situations, allegedly leaking or non-breathable rainwear was tested as 100% waterproof and customers problems have been solved and comfort improved by changing their clothing system to fast-drying technical synthetic fabrics. Technical synthetic baselayers quickly remove moisture from the skin surface allowing the breathable Hydronaute shellwear to expel it, keeping you dryer, warmer and more comfortable.

If you would like more information or assistance about the best clothing systems for adventure please get in touch with Mont Customer Service.


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