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Edelrid Jayne III Women's Climbing Harness Review by Lis Andres

March 13, 2020

Edelrid Jayne III Women's Climbing Harness Review by Lis Andres

A few weeks ago I updated my climbing harness to the Edelrid Jayne III. I highly recommend this model. It has features which make it the perfect harness for casual indoor, outdoor and/or competition climbing. As with most harnesses it comes in several sizes allowing people of all shapes and sizes to wear it.

Ederlid Jayne III Women's Climbing Harness

One of the features that I noticed immediately was the increased comfort of the harness over the previous model. Some harness’s don’t spread the weight well when sitting down into them but the Jayne III distributed it evenly over the entirety of both the leg and waist straps. It prevents pain from thin webbing sections digging into your skin when you are working a route for long periods. This harness also feels very safe and secure with the straps having lots of adjustability so it can go quite tight while still remaining comfortable, it is the type of harness a nervous or new climber will feel comfortable doing roofs in. Due to the adjustability, the harness is also extremely easy to climb into and out of quickly between climbs, which is great when competing.

When competing, it’s so comfortable I’ve been doing my full warm up in it, it means I don’t risk cooling down while putting gear on and means I have more options to make sure I’m ready to hit the wall when I’m called.

I have thoroughly enjoyed climbing and competing in the Edelrid Jayne III, it’s fantastic for projecting when I’m training and doesn’t cause me any discomfort while taking long breaks between attempts. When competing, it’s so comfortable I’ve been doing my full warm up in it, it means I don’t risk cooling down while putting gear on and means I have more options to make sure I’m ready to hit the wall when I’m called. Most importantly it inspires absolute confidence when I’m pulling hard moves in comps and risking big inverted whippers, I love climbing in the Edelrid Jayne III.

By Mont sponsored climber Lis Andres.

Shop Women's Jayne III Shop Men's Jay III

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