0

Your Cart is Empty

Climbing in Kassala, Sudan. By Chris Warner

January 30, 2020 2 Comments

Climbing in Kassala, Sudan. By Chris Warner

In the east of Sudan there lies a great collection of granite domes with a few existing routes and plenty of potential for more first ascents of impressive lines. All the climbing is situated above the town of Kassala.

Kassala, Sudan

Jonny Baker and I arrived in Kassala on the 25 December 2019 for a 20 day stay. We spent the first day exploring the many domes for new and existing lines. Previous information was very patchy and confusing with regards to names and locations. The towers don’t appear to have individual names but are grouped under two names, Jebel Totil and Jebel Taka. We decided to give more descriptive names to each feature in reference to their location. From our research there has been very little activity. The first climbing was done in 1939 by some Brits to gain the main summit of Jebel Taka. Some Czechs visited in 1981 and put up a few routes, French came in 2003 and put up about 3 lines and two Americas did a new route in 2013. Then some Brits came over a few visits and established several shorter lines on the smaller rock features and did some bouldering.

Chris Warner wearing Mont Polartec Power Dry Silk Weight Shirt and Mont Mojo Stretch Pants

Our first new route was up Middle Jebel on the north face. This is the only dome that you can walk up. We established the route ‘Jebel Rebel’, 6a+, 320m. The route was climbed ground up and bolts were placed on lead. The route offers some great mixed climbing that gets only a few hours of morning sun.

Jebel Rebel

We then went to climb the south face of Jebel Totil thinking we were doing a new route but found bolts on the second pitch. This was not surprising as it’s by far the easiest way to the summit. We climbed 3 pitches separated by some scrambling and made the summit in about two hours, we then rappelled the same line. The route gets full sun, so an early start is essential.

Kassala, Sudan

This route gave us access to the summit as we spied a dyke line on the west face we wished to climb. We then rap bolted and cleaned the dyke over 4 days. This line gives some amazing climbing on steep terrain on a continuous feature the whole way. The rock quality on the higher pitches was outstanding with interesting and fun climbing on positive holds. We named the route ‘False Prophet’, 7c, 340m. We then flew our paragliders from the summit back down and were greeted by hundreds of children from the small village we landed next to.

False Prophet climbing route, Kassala, Sudan

After this route we then climbed the existing routes, Khawadja on Jebel Taka North and the original route of Brown-Hodgkin 1939 on Jebel Taka. We flew again from both summits.

The last new route we established was on the North face of Jebel Totil. We named this route “Bat Shit Crazy’, 6c, 230m. This route was done ground up with bolts placed on lead. It starts with several slab pitches to gain the higher crack system that leads to the summit. This route gave some nice climbing on varied terrain.

Bat Shit Crazy climbing route in Kassala, Sudan.

Kassala offers a great deal more new routes over the many towers. The hot temperatures make it very difficult to climb on the south faces but most of the best rock faces more to the north aspects. We were fortunate to get many days with temperatures in the mid-twenties giving pleasant conditions in the shade. There are many cracks, but most are discontinuous and would require linking together with bolts between. The faces are very featured granite and surprisingly solid to climb. We found the local people to be most friendly and helpful, they didn’t seem to be bothered by our climbing on the rocks but were naturally puzzled as to why we had come so far to do this.

Chris Warner, Mont Ambassador

Mont Ambassador Chris Warner climbing in Power Dry Top and Mojo Stretch Pants

Paragliding from the top of climb. Chris Warner

Have you got an adventure story and photos of a recent trip with Mont gear that you'd like to see on our Blog? Then please send it to mont@mont.com.au with the subject line "Adventure Story for the Mont Blog". Please note that we get a large number of submissions and cannot post every story.


2 Responses

Acacia Rose
Acacia Rose

April 20, 2020

Exciting Chris. Great read and some inspiring pics.

Tony Warner
Tony Warner

April 11, 2020

Great article.

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in The Mont Blog

Researcher Dr Matthew Brookhouse checking a snowgum in the NSW Snowy Mountains. By Aaron Midson
Save Our Snowgums: Taking A Tree's Pulse. By Dr Matthew Brookhouse

January 17, 2022

Australian longicorn borers are known worldwide for their ability to aggressively infest eucalypt plantations. In Australia, too, longicorn outbreaks have struck plantations in Tasmania, Victoria and Queensland. By contrast, outbreaks of longicorns are rare in native eucalypt forests. Why? Well, it’s not clear, but the current theory is that to be successful, longicorn populations must develop in forests that are persistently drought-stressed. In plantations, a single species is often planted over a varying landscape that is, in some cases, too dry. Native eucalypt forests, however, generally comprise numerous species leading to a patterned landscape of species that is more resilient to stress.
Read More
Mt Field Snowgums texture by Geoff Murray
Mount Field Snowgums. By Geoff Murray

January 17, 2022

Over the last couple of days I have had a couple of short forays into Mount Field National Park. This magnificent park has landscapes that range from temperate rainforest with beautiful waterfalls to extensive alpine areas with some stunning mountain topography. Mount Field National Park, along with Freycinet National Park, were both declared national parks in 1916, making them the oldest national parks in Tasmania.
Read More
Fall Protection Anchors for Working at Height
Fall Protection Anchors for Working at Height

January 11, 2022

Fall protection needs to be fast and easy to setup to ensure it is used when it is needed. The right gear will only add a small amount of time to your site setup, stay out of your way while working, and be easy and intuitive to use. The first part of your Fall Protection System, the anchors, can be make or break for the efficiency of the system as a whole. Read more below about choosing the best anchors for your next job.
Read More
x

x